Overview

As I’ve worked with Basic Writing, co-requisite instruction and with using New Media in the writing classroom, my scholarship has moved in this direction as well. I recently presented on these topics at several regional and national conferences. After collaborating with another instructor and a consultant at our Writing Center to design an audio essay assignment for Basic Writing, I co-presented about that project and its benefits for students who are often “othered” when they first arrive on campus. Our presentation at Pedagogicon 2017 appears in the published conference proceedings and in a special section of The Journal of Faculty Development, vol. 31 no. 3.

I’ve similarly presented about my work with an ePortfolio redesign of ENG102 at Pedagogicon 2018; a related proposal has been accepted for the 2019 CCCC, where I will present along with one of my teaching colleagues and an EKU graduate student about our ongoing use of ePortfolios, grade contracts, and new media to support student learning.

My work with redesigning our Basic Writing and Reading courses into a co-requisite program is the foundation for presentations I’ve given at the Kentucky Association for Developmental Education (KADE 2017) and the National Association for Developmental Education (NADE 2018). My work in this area will also be the topic of my upcoming presentation at the 2018 Watson Conference in Louisville, Kentucky.

Currently, I am conducting classroom-based research focusing on how New Media projects affect students’ development of audience awareness and information literacy. I am particularly interested in how technology-rich writing courses, using available technologies —such as school computer labs, students’ smart phones, and open source or free ware apps and programs— can enhance students’ confidence, sense of curiosity, and openness to working with uncertainty. I also continue to study and teach about popular culture and fandom. I regularly present papers about rhetoric and popular culture, such as recent presentations at Rhetoric Society of America and the International Conference on Narrative regarding the rhetoric of nostalgia and its appearance and uses in texts ranging from the series Mad Men to Miyazaki’s animated film The Wind Rises. My related course offerings on Japanese and American popular culture are in demand among undergraduate and graduate students alike.

See below for a list of my publications and conference presentations.

Publications

Refereed Journal Articles

Ashby, Dominic. “Uchi/Soto in Japan: A Global Turn.” Comparative Rhetoric, special issue of Rhetoric Society Quarterly, vol. 43, no. 3, 2013, pp. 256–269.

This article is reprinted in Comparative Rhetoric: The Art of Traversing Rhetorical Times, Places, and Spaces, edited by LuMing Mao, Taylor and Francis, 2014.

Refereed Conference Proceedings

Ashby, Dominic, Margaret Frozena, and Jason Peerce. “I Hear What You’re Saying: Bringing New Media Pedagogy to Basic Writing.” Innovations in Teaching & Learning: Inaugural Proceedings of the 2017 Pedagogicon, edited by Russell Carpenter, Charlie Sweet, Hal Blythe, Matthew Winslow, and Shirley O’Brien, New Forums Press, 2017.

The Pedagogicon proceedings also appear as a special section in The Journal of Faculty Development, vol. 31, no. 3, 2017, pp. 63–67.

Ashby, Dominic. “To Say a Turning Word: Zen Rhetoric as Situated Enlightenment.” Kentucky Philological Review 31: Bulletin of the Forty-Third Annual Meeting, edited by Jimmy Dean Smith, Northern Kentucky University, 2017, pp. 57–67.

Ashby, Dominic. “Both Insiders and Outsiders: Re/Framing Identification via Japanese Rhetoric.” Re/Framing Identifications, edited by Michelle Ballif, Waveland, 2014, pp. 309–315.

Book Reviews

Ashby, Dominic and LuMing Mao. Review of Zen Buddhist Rhetoric in China, Korea, and Japan, edited by Christoph Anderl. Rhetoric Review, vol. 32 no. 3, 2013, pp. 368–373.

Ashby, Dominic. Review of Writing in the Devil’s Tongue: A History of English Composition in China, by Xiaoye You. JAC vol. 32 no. 1, 2012, pp. 416-424.

Ashby, Dominic. Review of The Idea of English in Japan: Ideology and the Evolution of a Global Language, by Philip Seargeant. TESOL Quarterly vol. 45 no. 1, 2011, pp. 194–196.

 

Conference Presentations

Ashby, Dominic and Margaret Frozena. “Integrating Digital High-Impact Practices in First-Year Writing: Blogs, Eportfolios, and Multimodality.” 2018 Pedagogicon: Student-Centered Teaching and Learning, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY. 18 May 2018.

Ashby, Dominic, Lisa Bosley, and Russell Carpenter. “When Writing Tutors Become Reading and Writing Tutors in an IRW Course.” The 42nd Annual Conference of the National Association for Developmental Education, National Harbor, MD. 23 February 2018.

Ashby, Dominic, Lisa Bosley, Clint Stivers, Margaret Frozena, Shawne Alexander, and Russell Carpenter. “The Impact of Course-Embedded Consultants on Students’ Revision Processes in a Co-Requisite Course.” Kentucky Association for Developmental Education (KADE) Conference, Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Lexington, KY. 27 October 2017.

Ashby, Dominic, Margaret Frozena, and Jason Peerce. “There’s Something About Access: New Media and Student Engagement in Basic Writing.” 2017 Pedagogicon: Innovations in Teaching and Learning, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY. 19 May 2017.

Ashby, Dominic. “The Rhetoric of Nostalgia in Miyazaki’s The Wind Rises: A Narrative of Celebration, Critique, and Cross-cultural Affiliation.” 2017 International Conference on Narrative, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 23–26 March 2017.

Ashby, Dominic. “Pastoral Techno-Fetishism and the Case For Interdependence: Reflective Nostalgia in the Anime Summer Wars.” Kentucky Philological Association Conference, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY. 3–4 March 2017.

Ashby, Dominic. “Reimagining the Changes of the Past: Nostalgia as Rhetoric.” Rhetoric Society of America Conference, Atlanta, GA. 27–29 May 2016.

Ashby, Dominic. “To Say a Turning Word: Zen Rhetoric as Situated Enlightenment.” Kentucky Philological Association Conference, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY. March 2016.

Ashby, Dominic. “Idealized Girlhood and the Rhetoric of Japaneseness: The Figure of the Japanese Schoolgirl as a Trope for Maintaining Regional Identity.” Kentucky Philological Association Conference, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY. March 2015.

Ashby, Dominic. “Opening the Gates of Academic Discourse: Inside–Outside Positionalities as Pedagogy in ESL/EFL Rhetoric and Composition Classrooms.” Conference on College Composition and Communication, Indianapolis, IN. March 2014.

Ashby, Dominic. “Contextualizing Affiliations: Fluid Insider–Outsider Identities.” Conference on College Composition and Communication, Las Vegas, NV. March 2013.

Ashby, Dominic. “Uchi/Soto in Japan: A Global Turn.” MLA Annual Convention, Boston, MA. January 2013.

Ashby, Dominic. “Both Insiders and Outsiders: Re/Framing Identifications in Japanese Rhetoric.” Rhetoric Society of America Conference, Philadelphia, PA. May 2012.

Ashby, Dominic. “Between Outside and Inside: Anime and Manga as Gateways to Japanese Rhetoric.” Conference on College Composition and Communication, St. Louis, MO. March 2012.

Ashby, Dominic. “Ainu Activism: Movements of Indigenous Rhetoric through Time and Place.” Conference on College Composition and Communication, Atlanta, GA. April 2011.

Ashby, Dominic. Amir Hassan, and Mandy Watts. “Multimodal Remix and/as Cultural Critique.” Poster Session. Conference on College Composition and Communication, Atlanta, GA. April 2011.

Ashby, Dominic. “Representing Japan, Embodying America: The Rhetoric of Two Japanese-American Memoirs.” Rhetoric Society of America Conference, Minneapolis MN. May 2010.

Ashby, Dominic. “Simulating the Virtual: Depictions of MMORPGs in Anime and Manga.” Computers and Writing, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN. May 2010.

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